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Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Engage your compassion, critical thinking, and communication skills to help all people from infants to the elderly. A degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders prepares you to enter the fields of speech language pathology, audiology, or speech and hearing science. By completing this degree, you may also pursue graduate studies in a variety of allied health professions that support child development, rehabilitation, swallowing, communication, or education.  

Courses involve learning about the human communication processes, and develop a strong foundation of theoretical knowledge in the areas of speech, language, neurology, anatomy and physiology of speech, language and hearing, voice, and fluency/stuttering. Students will also have clinical observation opportunities in order to experience first hand the diagnostic and intervention aspects of the profession. This degree program follows the guidelines set forth by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association for an undergraduate program of this type, ensuring that you are highly prepared for your future career.

The need for professionals in this job field is high, with 1 in every 10 Americans showing signs of a communication disorder.

Program Details

28 hours of major core
45 hours of a specialization
55 hours of general education

Total credit hours — 128

Sample Core Courses

  • Multicultural Aspects of Communication (CSDS 3003) — This course is an overview of the five components of language (phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics) related to global use of language specific to demographics/populations. This course will examine the influence culture has on the use of language and communication. Sociological perspectives and a Christian worldview will be discussed as related to linguistics.
  • Survey of the Exceptional Learner (ESED 3113) — This is a required course for certification in Exceptional Student Education, Elementary Education, and Secondary Education. This is an introductory course that examines the history, characteristics and issues in exceptional education. The course covers all areas of exceptionality and their manifestations from early childhood through adulthood. It is designed to provide students with a firm grounding in the foundations of special education and expose them to the reconstruction of the field, in order that they may better deal with new and ever-changing developments.
  • Developmental Psychology (PSYC 2333) — This course studies human growth and development across the lifespan. Major theories are critically examined with special attention to their differential application in the understanding of human development and behavior.
  • Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing (CSDS 2003) — This course will introduce students to the anatomical structure and physiological mechanisms essential for speech production and aural functioning.  Anatomy and physiology for respiration, phonation, articulation, and resonation will be discussed.

FAQs

The undergraduate program in Communication Sciences and Disorders is designed to provide students with pre-professional training in the basic nature of human communication. Coursework includes biological, physical, social, and linguistic aspects of communication. The coursework prepares students for professional training received in either a master’s degree program in Speech-Language Pathology or a clinical doctorate program in Audiology.  

At the undergraduate level, students do not specialize in either Speech-Language Pathology or Audiology. The degree provides the foundational knowledge for Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Related occupations may require additional training. 

  • Behavioral therapist for persons with disabilities, including children with autism 
  • Nonprofit organizations, such as Easter Seals, Special Olympics, Autism Society, Alzheimer’s Association, etc.
  • Healthcare insurance industry  
  • Early interventionist for children birth to age 3
  • Newborn hearing screenings
  • Rehabilitation aide in hospitals/outpatient clinics 
  • Activity coordinator for life care, assisted living, or skilled nursing facilities
  • Daycare center teacher/preschool aide 
  • Child life specialist 
  • Deaf educator
  • ASL interpreter  
  • Nursing assistant/CNA 
  • Substitute teacher 
  • Hearing aid dispenser  
  • Speech-language pathologist assistant 

Note: A bachelor’s degree in communication sciences and disorders will allow you to practice as a speech-language pathology assistant under the supervision of an SLP who holds their Certification of Clinical Competency in the state of Florida. However, requirements and opportunities vary by state. Some states require additional prerequisites for employment. For the most accurate information, search for speech-language pathology assistant licensure requirements by state. SEU’s program is pre-professional program specifically preparing you to continue on to a master’s level program.

Some of the following programs may require additional prerequisite coursework. Graduate programs should be contacted directly in order to know what is required by you as a student.

  • Master’s in speech-language pathology 
  • Clinical doctorate in audiology 
  • Master’s in special education 
  • Master’s in psychology (educational, clinical)
  • Master’s in occupational therapy  
  • Master’s in social work 
  • Master’s in counseling 
  • Master’s in public health 
  • Master’s in deaf education
  • Master’s in rehabilitation counseling  
  • Master’s in disability studies 
  • Master’s in nursing 
  • Master’s in gerontology
  • Master’s in allied health
  • Law
  • Physician’s assistant  
  • Doctoral degree in physical therapy  
  • Master’s and Graduate Certificate program in Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Master’s in child life

A master’s degree in speech-language pathology prepares the student for practice as a speech-language pathologist (SLP). The curriculum provides academic and clinical preparation for practice in areas of communication and swallowing across the lifespan. The average time-to-degree is two years of full-time study. Careers focus on assessing and treating persons with speech, language, voice, fluency, cognitive-communication, and swallowing disorders. Jobs may also entail educating individuals about alternative communication systems and their use, as well as performing research related to speech and language problems. After a Master’s of Science degree is obtained, an SLP gains certification through the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA) by passing the Praxis exam and completing a Clinical Fellowship. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 25% increase in speech-language pathology jobs between 2019 and 2029. 

Examples of work settings: 

  • School systems 
  • Health care (hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, acute care, outpatient, inpatient, assisted living facilities, home-health care) 
  • Private practice 
  • Early intervention 
  • Telepractice  
  • Contract work

After completion of the master’s degree, some SLP’s pursue doctoral degrees: 

  • Research doctorate in speech-language pathology or speech and hearing sciences
  • Clinical doctorate in speech-language pathology

  • ONET provides a summary of skill sets based on occupations as well as an outlook for employability. This website provides multiple resources, including links to available jobs, such as a Speech-Language Pathologist and Audiologist.
  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) is a national organization that supports the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology. ASHA also provides ethics and practice guidelines. Visit the website ASHA.org for information about assessments, interventions, best practice, research, and resources for students.

Information for Students Interested in Communication Sciences and Disorders 

 

Professional Core

Survey of the Exceptional Learner

Introduction to Language Development and Communication Disorders

Applied Linguistics

Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing

Speech and Hearing Science

Multicultural Aspects of Communication

Developmental Psychology

Child and Adolescent Development

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab

Specialization

Articulation and Phonology

Phonetics

Speech Disorders and Interventions

Hearing Disorders and Interventions

Language Disorders and Interventions

Audiology

Neurology of Speech, Language, and Hearing

Diagnostic Methods

Fluency and Voice Disorders

Neurology of Communication Disorders

Perspectives of the Deaf

Clinical Methods

Language and Literacy

Senior Practicum

It is important to note that related occupations may require additional training. 

  • Behavioral therapist for persons with disabilities, including children with autism 
  • Nonprofit organizations, such as Easter Seals, Special Olympics, Autism Society, Alzheimer’s Association, etc.
  • Healthcare insurance industry  
  • Early interventionist for children birth to age 3
  • Newborn hearing screenings
  • Rehabilitation aide in hospitals/outpatient clinics 
  • Activity coordinator for life care, assisted living, or skilled nursing facilities
  • Daycare center teacher/preschool aide 
  • Child life specialist 
  • ASL interpreter  
  • Nursing assistant/CNA 
  • Substitute teacher 
  • Hearing aid dispenser  
  • Speech-language pathology assistant 

Note: A bachelor’s degree in communication sciences and disorders will allow you to practice as a speech- language pathology assistant under the supervision of an SLP who holds their Certification of Clinical Competency in the state of Florida. However, requirements and opportunities vary by state. Some states require additional prerequisites for employment. For the most accurate information, search for speech-language pathology assistant licensure requirements by state. SEU’s program is pre-professional program specifically preparing you to continue on to a master’s level program.

View Programs:               Program Option:          

Careers. (2021). Pennsylvania State University. Retrieved from https://hhd.psu.edu/csd/undergraduate/careers

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. (2021). Retrieved from https://www.asha.org/ 

Bolles, D. (2021). What can I do with a degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders? Bowling Green State University. Retrieved from https://www.bgsu.edu/health-and-human-services/programs/department-of-communication-sciences-and-disorders/undergraduate-program/CDIS-post-graduate-planning.html

Bureau of Labor and Statistics. (2021) Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/mobile/fastest-growing.htm?testing